With Christmas approaching and the world seemingly getting back to normal after Covid 19, many people will be thinking of taking a well-earned break to end 2020, either domestically or perhaps overseas.

Some people have family overseas and they may wish to take advantage of the holidays for a visit and to be reunited with loved ones. This is not at all an uncommon scenario with Australia hosting people from many diverse backgrounds, and unsurprisingly children from separated families may have grandparents or other extended family living in other countries.

Travel within Australia for separated families 

Separated parents will be faced with decisions for their children (their own and the other parent’s decisions) that may not have been an issue when they were together. In my experience, quite a common decision where disputes can arise is when one parent may want to take children on an interstate holiday. The reasons why this is an issue can be complex ranging from lack of trust post separation, concerns as to the capacity of the travelling parent to care for the child responsibly – to a parent feeling uncomfortable about a child being far away etc. 

The family law system recognises that making decisions for children is part of the responsibilities of parenthood. Further, where there is “equal shared parental responsibility”, section 65DAC Family Law Act 1975 (“the Act”) requires that parents consult with each other, make a genuine effort to make a joint decision, and that a decision is made jointly. This applies to decisions relating to “major long terms issues” defined in sections 4 of the Act as including things such as religion, health, change of name, living arrangements that would make a parent’s time significantly more difficult and education. 

An interstate holiday is not likely to be a major long-term issue. Section 65DAE of the Act provides that decisions that are not major long-term decisions don’t need to be made jointly and therefore an interstate holiday doesn’t need to be agreed to by the other parent. If there is an order, it would need to be taken during the travelling parent’s time – if children are at school it should be during school holiday time.

When an interstate holiday arises as an issue, sometimes a parent will seek a specific order regulating or preventing interstate travel. 

The Federal Circuit Court, Family Court or a State Court exercising jurisdiction under the Act has power to make this type of order in relation to a child. Section 64B(2)(i) allows the Court to make orders about “any aspect of the care, welfare or development of the child or any other aspect of parental responsibility for a child”. Further power is contained within section 68B to restrain a person from entering or remaining in a specific area.

An order pursuant to section 64B requires that the Court treat the “best interests of the child” as the paramount consideration for the Judge exercising his or her discretion. Thus, a parent seeking to restrict the travel would need to establish why the order sought is in the best interests of the child. 

For an injunction pursuant to section 68B the Court would have regard to best interests and whether the order was appropriate for the welfare of the child. 

International travel for separated families 

In this context I’m talking about an overseas holiday and not a decision to relocate overseas. An international relocation would be a major long-term issue and required to be made jointly where there is equal shared parental responsibility.

If a proceeding is before the Court, or a parenting order has been made, a party is not permitted to remove a child from Australia without permission. Section 65Y and Section 65Z make it an offence punishable by up to 3 years imprisonment to remove the child from Australia without the written consent of the other parties.

If you are in the process of negotiating a parenting order, and you would like to take a child on a holiday overseas, permission of the other party ought to be obtained and recorded in the parenting order. This can be done on an interim or final basis. If you already have a final order and missed including an international travel clause, you will need written permission to go. 

Usually conditions will be agreed to/placed on the travel such as sufficient notice before travelling, restrictions on what country having regard to Government travel information such as Smart Traveller, a copy of the itinerary being provided to the other party, and contact details while overseas.

If no agreement is reached by the parents, then once again the Court has power to make an order allowing the overseas travel on an interim or final basis (the same power as for interstate travel).

The Court will treat the best interests of the child as paramount once again in making the order. Typically, in this situation the Court will be balancing the benefit to the child in experiencing the travel against any risk that a parent may not return the children to Australia. This is not a legal requirement, but it is the most common reason in my experience why a parent raises an objection to travel. Like with any Court application, evidence would be required to demonstrate why there is a risk a parent won’t return to Australia.

If a parent has concerns and wants to prevent a child’s international travel, they can take steps to place the name of the child on the Family Law Watchlist through the Federal Police. This would prevent a child being removed pending an application to the Court being made with respect to the child. 

If a child’s name is placed on the Family Law Watchlist and later orders are made for travel, it is important to make sure that the child’s name has been taken off the Watchlist before travelling and take a copy of the sealed order to the airport with you.

Family law advice

If you have any queries in relation to separation, divorce, de facto relationships, property settlement or child support payments, my firm Hooper Family Lawyers can assist you with practical advice. 

We are family lawyers servicing all areas in Brisbane and on the Gold Coast.

Separation is a very difficult time for many people which is not surprising given that typically it combines some form of loss with fear and uncertainty as to the future. 

Family lawyers are not counsellors but a good family lawyer ought to be able to empathise with the situation clients find themselves in; and provide some guidance as to what the best course of action will be in their circumstances.

The best solution for separation is reconciliation provided that underlying issues are addressed. The Family Law Act 1975 section 12C and 12E create obligations on legal practitioners to provide separating people with information regarding reconciliation services that may assist them. 

Often however once people have made the decision to attend the lawyer’s office, they have already explored every option to save the relationship and have arrived at their point of no return.

Everyone’s circumstances are different but, in my experience, the following tips can help make the process less stressful, costly and timelier.

What to do when you have just recently separated?

The very first thing in my view is to get family law advice. You can typically do this in an attendance at a lawyer’s office for a “first meeting” with a lawyer. 

The difficult part for clients is knowing which lawyer to choose, which can also be the most important part. 

For some people budget will make a difference. Many lawyers offer free initial consultations, some give a 20-minute free phone consultation and there are community legal centres available. The thing to remember here is “you get what you pay for”. 

My view is that the initial attendance is of critical importance in providing information that can affect the entire process or outcome of a client’s case. 

Because everyone has different situations and circumstances, I don’t believe a lawyer can be adequately assess a client’s needs, provide advice as to the law, process, evidence and costs within 20 minutes or just “over the phone”. But because lawyers sell their time, it must be costs effective for the lawyer to take the time and manage the client’s budget. 

We overcome this by placing no strict limit on the time a client attends upon us for the advice, while charging a “fixed fee”. Thus, the client doesn’t have to worry about looking at their watch and is free to explore all the questions they may have in an unrushed environment. In my experience at this first meeting, with a well-managed meeting, typically within 1 to 2 hours (at an average of 1 hour 30 minutes) most client’s report leaving our office “feeling better”, with an understanding of what they need to do moving forward. We also offer an after-interview phone call if there is something unclear or if a further question arises.

The information that we impart at this meeting covers issues such as:

  1. A summary of the law and how it applies to the client’s situation.
  2. An explanation of the processes available to resolve the matter by consent and processes if an agreement is not readily forthcoming.
  3. Provide a case strategy.
  4. Provide a strategy to get to an agreement with the other party, how to communicate and the steps most likely to maintain or promote amicable discussions.
  5. What to do and not to do in terms of proposed actions.
  6. Referral if necessary, to other information or service that may assist.
  7. As accurately as possible longer-term costs estimates, estimated costs for different outcomes/strategies, advice as to how to reduce legal costs, examining strategy and outcomes in the context of budget.

In essence, most legal services are about providing “damage control” for a client. “Cost exposure” is a necessary element of damage control, and also important in terms of the information a client needs to make commercial decisions.  

Equally important is expertise. You need to have confidence in the advice you are receiving because, frankly, you’re dealing with your life savings and your children in many family law matters. 

Family lawyers like anyone have different levels of experience and ability. Once thing that can help differentiate between lawyers is whether they are a “family law accredited specialist”. An accredited specialist has been through very rigorous further study, academic examinations, practical examinations and has had a minimum of 5 years’ experience.  Looking at a lawyer’s bio on their firm’s website can be helpful as well.

Some general tips to assist post separation 

From a practical perspective, after receiving initial advice and making contact with a lawyer, negotiations can commence. A negotiated outcome is by far the best outcome that can be achieved in family law. The quicker this can occur is better (and cheaper) still.

My view is that without some information and guidance from a lawyer you shouldn’t really start negotiations. The reason I say this is because unless you understand family law, you’re likely to get into an “information dispute” with the other party. Different people have different ideas about how the system works and if a clash arises, conflict which is counterproductive to negotiation, can result. 

Another reason is a party can become “positioned”. This means something discussed is agreed to or misunderstood, and it can be difficult to move away from later on (say after getting advice). If both parties get advice there should be a fair degree of overlap in terms of expected outcomes, making an agreement more likely.

Maintaining good communication is another tip. I’m not sure if this is ever easy post separation. If you are able to keep things as amicable as possible it will make resolution much more likely. I normally recommend for to people to keep communication “businesslike”, if possible, to negotiate in writing and to avoid “mirroring” if someone says something you don’t like. Mirroring is where someone says something irritating and the other person does the same in return, usually leading to an escalation in conflict.

It is most important though to remember that everyone’s case is different, and strategy should be tailored to your situation. There is no one size fits all in family law. 

Family law advice

If you have any queries in relation to family violence or parenting orders, my firm Hooper Family Lawyers can assist you with practical advice. 

We are family lawyers servicing all areas in Brisbane and on the Gold Coast.

It is not uncommon in family law parenting matters for issues of domestic violence to arise. Family violence is relevant evidence for the court to consider in determining what parenting order will be in the best interests of children. 

At the same time, a party to the parenting orders may have obtained a domestic violence order against the other party (or both parties may have orders) and often the children the subject of a parenting order will be named on a domestic violence order.

In my experience this can create confusion for people uncertain whether they can still interact with their children or the other party while an exclusion provision under a domestic violence order (such as not coming within 100 metres of a party or child’s school or residence), is in place,

What is the difference between Domestic Violence and Parenting Orders?

One difference between domestic violence orders and parenting orders is jurisdiction. Domestic violence orders are created under State legislation while parenting orders come under Commonwealth jurisdiction conveyed by the Family Law Act 1975.

Thus, different States have different law and names for these orders. The different State and Territory names are:

  • Queensland – Protection Orders. 
  • NSW – Apprehended Violence Orders.
  • ACT – Family Violence Order.
  • Victoria – Family Violence Intervention Order.
  • Tasmania – Family Violence Order or Police Family Violence Order.
  • South Australia – Intervention Order.
  • Western Australia – Restraining Order.
  • Northern Territory – Domestic Violence Order.

While the names are different, they all serve the same purpose which is to impose conditions on the Respondent to the order to do, or refrain from doing things such as:

  • Be of “good behaviour” and not commit domestic violence towards a person.
  • Not contact or approach a person or within a certain distance of a person.
  • Not approach within a certain distance of where a person works or lives. 
  • Other conditions that are authorised by the State legislation.

These orders are civil not criminal order, but a breach of an order is a criminal offense. 

Parenting orders typically regulate who children live with, how parents are to cooperate in making decisions for their children, and when and how a person spends time and communicates with their children. There is also power in the Family Law Act 1975 to make personal protection injunctions similar to the conditions in domestic violence orders. 

Obviously when one order is saying, for example, a person is not to come within 100 metres of a child or school, but a parenting order provides, that person is to collect the child from school at a certain time, conflict between the orders would appear to arise.

Resolving conflict between Domestic Violence Order and Parenting Orders

A situation similar to the above example recently arose in Tasmania in PQR v Sundram [2020] TASSC 21 where a Magistrate convicted a father of breaching a Police Protection Order when the father attended a school at various times to either speak to the principal and/or visit his daughter. 

The Magistrate dismissed some of the charges, but found him guilty on others, with the above case concerning a review of the charges he was convicted of. 

The issue was an earlier parenting order allowed the father to spend time with his daughter for certain periods of a fortnightly cycle, and that he collect her from school. The subsequent domestic violence order provided that the not come within 50 metres of his daughter or the school. 

Some of the charges related to times when the father was authorised by the parenting order to collect and spend time with the daughter; while other charges related to times not covered by the parenting order. 

The father argued that section 33 of the Tasmanian Family Violence Act 2004 provides, “…[a domestic violence order] operates subject to any Family Court order…” Also, the order with respect to coming within 50 metres of his child was expressed to be “except in accordance with an order of a court of competent jurisdiction…”. Not surprisingly he wasn’t convicted on the charges where he was authorised by the parenting order to spend time.

However, the domestic violence order preventing him from attending the school was not expressed to be “except in accordance with an order of a court of competent jurisdiction”. Therefore, the question was whether it was capable of co-existing with the parenting order. 

The Magistrate found that the father could collect the child from school without approaching within 50 metres of it. It was acknowledged this wasn’t ideal and might present other consequences, but it wasn’t inconsistent. The father was convicted with respect to the counts where he attended the school.

However on review Chief Justice Blow determined the order not to approach the school was “adjunct” to the order not to approach within 50 metres of the children, and neither operated during times that the father was to spend time pursuant to the parenting order.

This left one charge where the father attended the school outside of parenting order times. An argument was raised by counsel for the father that one of the parenting orders allowed for “equal shared parental responsibility”. Parental responsibility means “all the duties, powers, responsibilities and authority which by law parents have in relation to children”, and it was argued this also meant attending a school to speak with teachers. The Chief Justice determined that while the domestic violence order was an impediment to parental responsibility it was not inconsistent.

Queensland Domestic Violence Law

The relevant domestic violence legislation in Queensland is the Domestic and Family Violence Protection Act 2012. There are several sections of this legislation that refer to the interaction of family law orders and Protection Orders:

  • Section 5 and the dictionary schedule define “family law order”.
  • Section 78 requires the State court to “consider” a family law order.
  • Section 79 an applicant must disclose any family law order. 
  • Section 107D requires that a police officer issuing a Police Protection Notice ask about any family law order and not make a condition inconsistent with a family law order or apply to a Magistrate to have a proposed inconsistent condition made.

Within the Family Law Act 1975 section 68R empowers a State Magistrates Court in a domestic violence proceeding to revive, vary, discharge or suspend an existing order, injunction or arrangement under the Family Law Act.

Tips for Domestic Violence matters involving children

If you find yourself as the Respondent to a domestic violence proceeding, I recommend the following:

  • Get legal advice at an early stage. It is important that you speak to someone to give you some orientation and understanding of the laws, system and process you find yourself in. Legal services are expensive however most lawyers, my firm included, only charge a relatively modest fee for initial advice.
  • Make sure you participate in the court process. If you fail to attend court, you will have no control over the conditions on the Protection Order and a final order could be made in your absence. If you’re anxious about court, you can hire a family law solicitor to appear for you or sometimes a “duty lawyer” may be available to assist. In some circumstances you can seek Legal Aid assistance.
  • Tell the court about any family law orders or parenting plans that you have. Depending on the seriousness of the domestic violence allegations most Magistrates will want to ensure children’s rights to have contact with parents is advanced, provided it is consistent with their safety. 
  • If possible, have your lawyer negotiate on your behalf with the aggrieved. Most family violence orders will make exception for things such as communication via lawyers, attending other court or mediation or spending time and communicating with children. Make sure your orders contain these conditions.
  • Make sure you have read and understood the Protection Order conditions. If in doubt, ask your lawyer (or even the Magistrate) what the conditions mean. 
  • Abide by the conditions. Breaching a Protection Order is a criminal offence. 

Of the above my view is the first point and the last point are the most important. Get information early and make sure you don’t breach the order.

Family law advice

If you have any queries in relation to family violence or parenting orders, my firm Hooper Family Lawyers can assist you with practical advice. 

We are family lawyers servicing all areas in Brisbane and on the Gold Coast.

The vast majority of Family Lawyers will do everything they can to keep their client’s out of Court and try to settle the cases they run amicably (if possible) and as early on as possible to reduce legal costs. 

A good lawyer achieves this through making sure their clients are well advised as to the range of potential outcomes, has identified issues that may affect the range of outcomes, has worked to resolve information disputes by obtaining valuations and disclosure and provided their client with as accurate as possible costs estimates. This information allows a client to make an informed assessment of risk and weigh the cost/benefit of settling early.

Early settlements are also achieved by maintaining a respectful and non-confrontational communication style with the lawyer representing the other party or self-represented litigant. Third parties such as mediators are also of enormous assistance in resolving disputes at the early stages.

However, despite the best efforts of lawyers and parties sometimes it is necessary to file a proceeding in Court in order to move it forward or resolve a dispute that is intractable. 

To be frank, in any civilised society there is only two options to resolve a dispute, and they are by an agreement reached between the parties or by a Court making an order. 

What does it mean to go to Court?

For Family Law disputes there are three Courts that most often exercise the jurisdiction conferred by the Family Law Act 1975. These are:

  • State Magistrates Court exercising jurisdiction under the Family Law Act 1975. It is not often that a Family Law proceeding would be filed in a State Magistrates Court. Typically, a State Magistrate Court would only be involved to make a “Consent Order” and not hear a disputed matter.
  • The Family Court which is the “higher Court” exercising jurisdiction under the Family Law Act 1975. The Family Court typically hears matters that are more complex such as complex property matters, matters where serious allegation of risk towards children are made and other particular matters such as adoption or disputed medical procedures for children.
  • The Federal Circuit Court is the “workhorse” Court in Family Law matters. This Court is likely where your matter will be commenced, and this Court handles the majority of the “usual” property and parenting disputes.

Many people think that once their matter “goes to Court” it will be heard by the Judge at the first date and resolved. This is not the case. Once a matter is filed in Court a process commences that may take many Court appearances before a resolution can occur.

Why are there numerous Court appearance before a Judge can make a decision?

This is necessary because the reality is matters in dispute are numerous, Judges are few and Court time is expensive for the taxpayer. 

Once a matter is started in Court by filing an Application, the basic process is for the Court to make directions for evidence to be gathered before a “hearing” can occur and for the parties to make further attempts at negotiation or mediation.

The Court process is formal and must be fair to both parties so there are rules that must apply to how the matter is conducted and how the Court receives evidence. Thus, Court appearances have different designations as to what is to occur on a particular day. Again, agreements between the parties are encouraged and almost any agreement can be made, and the matter finalised, regardless of what the purpose of the day is.

The types of Court days are:

  • Mention or Directions – A “mention” is a Court date when the Judge will be informed as to what the matter is about, what the issues are, and what “directions” may need to be made for the collection of evidence or further Court dates. The first date after the Application and Response is filed is usually a mention unless there is some urgency to making an “interim” decision. In the vast majority of cases interim orders for children and what needs to occur by way of directions will be negotiated and agreed at the first Court date. 
  • Interim Application – This is a Court date when the Court must make a decision on a particular issue before the main hearing. Interim hearings are a short process of up to 2 hours duration only. This would occur for example where the interim parenting orders could not be agreed or in a property matter where assets needed to be protected, a party wanted to exclude another party from living at the home or a party needed maintenance or access to some funds. An interim hearing is conducted by affidavits without cross examination and therefore the Court cannot determine any disputed facts. 
  • Callover – This is when the Court will allocate a trial date if the matter is ready to proceed. Trial time is valuable so before allocating this time to a matter the Judge will want to know how many witnesses, how long the matter might take, whether any issues have been resolved etc.
  • Trial – This is likely the last Court date. A trial is where the parties are cross examined on their affidavit, lawyers make submissions and the Judge will make “finding of fact”. This means that after hearing the evidence the Judge will determine what evidence is found to be true. The Judge will then apply the relevant law to those facts.

There are other Court dates that can occur such as “Conciliation Conference” which are similar to mediation or Appeals if a party believes a Judge made an error. 

The good news is that most matters don’t make it all the way to a trial. Most matters settle at some point along the way once the benefit of further evidence is obtained, the Judge may focus attention on a particular issue, costs increase and as other issues are resolved creating motivation for closure.

What should you do when you’re in Court?

The Judge sitting in Court represents the authority of the State to determine a dispute. 

The origin of which date back to the early Norman Kings in England (who had the “divine right of Kings” i.e. said to be appointed by God) and allowed subjects to come before the King to determine disputes. This had a stabilising influence on society by establishing a “rule of law”. I said earlier there are two ways to determine a dispute in a “civilised” society i.e. an agreement or an order from the Court. Without the Court there would be agreements …or whoever was able to use force to get what they want. 

Thus, the Courts are imperative to maintaining a civilised society and it is very important the authority of the Court is respected.

Respect for the Court today means that while you’re in Court:

  • Bow to the Judge if the Judge is sitting at the bench when you enter or leave the Court room.
  • Do not wear any hat or have sunglasses on your head. Dress appropriately. You don’t have to wear a suit or tie if you’re not a lawyer but dressing appropriately communicates to the Court you respect the process you’re involved in. 
  • If you are speaking to the Judge the proper address is “your Honour”.
  • Do not speak to the person next to you in the gallery unless it is absolutely necessary. Sometimes lawyers will whisper to each other with last minute negotiations before their matter is called but this ought to be avoided. The Judge is focused on the matter before them and typically they don’t appreciate being distracted. 
  • Often when you are in Court and supporting a friend, or if it is your matter, you will hear something you don’t like or don’t agree with. In this situation keep your poker face. Don’t smile, roll your eyes, stare at someone, shake your head etc. Don’t be argumentative or rude – especially with the Judge.
  • If you’re self-represented or addressed by the Judge directly focus on listening and not on speaking. It is natural that you’ll want to tell the Judge all of your concerns however this is rarely appropriate unless you’re making submissions at a trial or interim hearing. More often than not this goes badly for the person speaking. The Judge might want specific information so to give that information and don’t try to qualify it or give context. There will be time for that later. The same applies if you’re being cross examined. It’s an exercise in listening and not speaking. Cross examination is where the other party is scoring their points. Your points are in your affidavit so just answer the questions as honestly and succinctly as possible, and if you don’t understand ask the question be repeated and/or say if you don’t understand.

There are fewer physical appearances while Covid 19 is upon us but the same rules apply if you’re appearing by video or phone.

Going to Court is stressful, especially if you find yourself in a trial. It is also expensive and time consuming and it is much preferred that a negotiated settlement can be reached. Before deciding to go to Court you should have a good reason why. You should know what the impediment to settlement is, what will the costs be financially and emotionally, and you need to have confidence in your Family Lawyer providing the advice you are relying on to make these decisions.

Family law advice

If you have any queries in relation to separation, divorce, de facto relationships, property settlement or child support payments, my firm Hooper Family Lawyers can assist you with practical advice. 

We are family lawyers servicing all areas in Brisbane and on the Gold Coast.

The Covid 19 pandemic has created chaos for the lives of many people and industries. Within the Family Law and wider legal industry, the effects have largely been to cause lawyers to adapt to new ways of practice and for Courts to modify how they operate. Obviously, the thrust of these changes is to remove/reduce physical contact and interactions.

For Gold Coast Family Lawyers with clients in Border Zones there are increased challenges in parenting matters when Orders are in place, but children live at different times on both sides of the border. 

I live in a Northern New South Wales in a border zone and commute to my Gold Coast and Victoria Point law practices, and thus do a cross border commute each day. Having lived with this situation for some time, and having clients regularly asking me how the border rules work, I thought it might be a good topic to write about this week.

Border Restrictions Direction 12 

At the moment, Border Restrictions Direction 12 is in effect from 1.00 am Thursday 20 August 2020 until 2 October 2020 unless it is extended by regulation (and my money is on it being extended). 

The restrictions are made under the Public Health Act 2005, when on 29 January 2020 the Minister for Health and Minister for Ambulance Services made an order declaring a public health emergency in relation to COVID 19.

The direction requires that all people who come into Queensland practice “social distancing” which means staying within 1.5 metres of another person and regularly washing hands.

Entering Queensland 

A person entering Queensland from New South Wales must obtain a Queensland Border Declaration Pass and provide an undertaking to present for a COVID 19 test if they develop COVID 19 symptoms. 

To obtain a Border Declaration Pass you must declare via the website the following information regarding the last 14 days:

  • Whether you have been overseas.
  • Have you been to COVID 19 “hotspot” or been in contact with an infected person?
  • Whether you have COVID 19 (entry will be denied).

The information required on the declaration is:

  • Name, date of birth, phone number, address and email address.
  • Evidence of identity such as a driver’s license or Medicare care card.
  • For a border resident, state the post code to establish that the person if from a border zone. A “border zone” is one of the post codes set out in the schedule of the 

The Border Declaration Pass is valid for the following periods:

  • Expires after 7 days from the day the declaration is made; or
  • If any of the person’s circumstances have changed since making the declaration.

There are some people who are not required to provide a border declaration pass. These people are:

  • Someone responding to an emergency in Queensland and performing an essential activity related to national or state security, police, health or emergency services.
  • A maritime crew under the Protocol for Maritime Crew approved by the Chief Health Officer.
  • A prisoner remanded in custody subject to an extradition order who is required to enter Queensland to comply with a court order or assist with an investigation at the direction of the law enforcement agency.

Quarantine is necessary if a person entering Queensland:

  • Has travelled overseas in the prior 14 days.
  • Has had contact with a person who is a confirmed case of COVID 19,
  • Has been in a COVID 19 hotspot.
  • Has had symptoms consistent with COVID 19.
  • Is a border zone resident who is a Queensland resident who traveled outside the border zone in New South Wales.

Conflict between Parenting Order and the COVID 19 restrictions 

People are required to meet their obligations under Parenting Orders unless either the parent or the child is restricted by the COVID 19 rules. Thus, if the children cannot travel interstate because of restrictions this would likely be determined to be a “reasonable excuse” and a defense to a breach of a Parenting Order. As with any Contravention Application ultimately each case is decided on its particular facts.

For this reason, before a parent decides to breach an Order because of COVID 19, it would be prudent to look closely at the current state of the border restrictions and make sure that the information or understanding being acted upon is up to date and correct. Given that the rules can change swiftly this needs to be reviewed from time to time.

If a parent’s time cannot occur, alternative contact should be negotiated. Ultimately it is children who have the right to contact with their parents and coming up with a creative solution is a “child focused” response when COVID 19 gets in the way.

Family law advice

If you have any queries in relation to separation, divorce, de facto relationships, property settlement or child support payments, my firm Hooper Family Lawyers can assist you with practical advice. 

We are family lawyers servicing all areas in Brisbane and on the Gold Coast.

It’s not unusual in many areas of law to apply time limits to the performance of a task or making a claim. Typically, time limits are something that lawyers are very mindful of when first meeting with, and advising a client, because if time limits are missed, the family lawyer could potentially be liable if a client suffers loss.

Sometimes “timing” is important to a client as well. I have often been asked “should I wait to do my divorce before I finalise property settlement?” or with respect to relocating children “should I wait before going to Court”? These types of situations fall into the strategy of a case and there are many more examples where timing is important for a satisfactory outcome.

The following are some (not all) of the important references to time that occur when you’re involved in a Family Law matter.

Divorce

Since 1975 there has only been one ground for Divorce in Australia. That is “irretrievable breakdown of the marriage”. This is evidenced by a 12-month continuous period of separation. However, to promote the opportunity for reconciliation, married couples can get back together for up to 3 months without “resetting the clock”.

For example, if I’m separated for 3 months and get back together for up to another 3 months and then separate again, the first 3 months is counted as part of the 12-month continuous period of separation. If I get back with my husband or wife for 4 months though, the 12 months would need to start again. 

Also, if I’m only married for 2 years there is an additional requirement for a “counselling certificate” and counselling before the Divorce can be filed. Again, this is designed to “give love a second chance” and see whether the marriage can be saved. 

Limitation periods for property claims

There are restrictions on when a claim for property settlement can be brought which are slightly different for married or de facto relationship couples. Lawyers call these time limits “Limitation Periods”.

The time limits are:

  • For married couples within 1 year of the date of a Divorce.
  • For de facto couples within 2 years of separation. 

For married couples the time limit will not commence until a Divorce occurs. Many people think of the Divorce as covering all of the property and children’s issues however this is not the case. 

A Divorce is only the termination of the marriage. People can resolve parenting issues and property settlement without ever being Divorced. Conversely, people can be Divorced and not resolve property issues.

There are some cases where people have waited long periods of time, haven’t been Divorced and seek property settlement (some more than 20 years after separation). This is not advisable as it introduces much complexity into the issues to be resolved. Without delving too far into issues of “contributions”, contributions have a different character post separation and long period of separate economic activity can be difficult to assess. In some cases, Courts have determined that after such a long period it may be no longer “just and equitable” to adjust property interests, which is a requirement of the power of the Court to Order a property settlement.

Most married people make the property settlement a priority before the Divorce and in my view this is sensible. There is no danger of the Limitation Period expiring and it makes the process simpler. In my experience complexity in legal matters typically means higher costs.

For de facto couples since 2009 (in most states) they enjoy the same processes as married couples, and the substantiative law is largely the same. However, not so regarding the Limitation Period. While married couple have 1 year it operates from the date they obtain a Divorce. De facto couples have 2 years but this time starts running from the date they separate.

In practical terms a looming Limitation Period means to protect it from expiring a Court Application must be made. Most people don’t want to go to Court and would prefer to negotiate a settlement so making sure there is sufficient time is important. Going to Court doesn’t mean you can’t negotiate a resolution, but it adds to stress and costs.

What if the Limitation Period does expire?

If the Limitation Period does expire it doesn’t necessarily mean you can’t proceed with a claim. 

However before making the claim the other party would need to consent to it proceeding or permission of the Court (known as leave of the Court), would need to be obtained.

Leave of the Court will be granted if the Applicant can successfully establish “hardship” to a party or a child.

There are numerous cases with respect to hardship, some of the main points are as follows:

  • Hardship is akin to hardness, severity, privation, that which is hard to bear or a substantial detriment (Whitford [1979] FamCA 3).
  • Weight ought to be given to the intention of the limitation periods (Whitford [1979] FamCA 3).
  • Matters such as the length of the delay, reasons for the delay, prejudice to the respondent occasioned by the delay, the strength of the applicant’s case and the degree of hardship… are to be give weight. (Sharp [2011] FamCAF 150 citing Whitford).
  • The application ought to have a prima facie case worth pursuing not the mere loss of a cause of action. (Sharp [2011] FamCAF 150).
  • “Prejudice” to the respondent includes where a party is faced with a cause of action, he or she had no reason to expect or had been led to believe would not be brought.” (Frost & Nicholson [1981] FamCA 45).

If the other party requires the Applicant to obtain leave apart from the risk of the Court denying the Application, costs will be significantly increased.

The moral of the story is (in my opinion) there is no substitute for early advice from a specialist family lawyer for advice, including with respect to issues such as timing.

Other Family Law time considerations

Your family lawyer will be able to advise you with respect to timing issues from time under the Federal Circuit Court Rules 2001 or Family Law Rules 2004 to take certain steps, or the need to respond to a time limit imposed by a family law solicitor acting for your ex-partner. 

Being experienced lawyers, we know the tactical considerations that ought to be borne in mind. With parenting matters this can be critical to your case because a change in a child’s circumstances can be material to the outcome.

The bottom-line is don’t procrastinate, be proactive and find out where you stand early following separation.

Family law advice

If you have any queries in relation to separation, divorce, de facto relationships, property settlement or child support payments, my firm Hooper Family Lawyers can assist you with practical advice. 

We are family lawyers servicing all areas in Brisbane and on the Gold Coast.

I have noticed that as the Covid-19 crisis has continued, many parents have sought advice as to whether the lock down and restriction of movement means parenting orders no longer need to be complied with. 

In some case I have seen parents use Covid 19 as an excuse to breach orders in circumstances that in my view represents a clear breach. I currently have instructions to file proceedings on one such matter. 

Unfortunately, there is never an easy answer to whether a decision to breach an order amounts to a “reasonable excuse” and Covid 19 is not something we have seen before. 

Helpfully the Family Court and Federal Circuit Court of Australia have released a statement from the Honourable Will Alstergren, Chief Justice and Chief Judge of those courts, to assist the public and provide guidance.

Are the courts closed during Covid-19?

No. The courts are open and hearing cases. Most courts have however modified their procedures to decrease the necessity for personal contact. This means more court appearances being heard by electronic means (telephone or video). 

There are also procedures to increase the use of electronic documents (discussed in my previous blog on this topic) and since then a move away from requiring signatures on Affidavits (see Joint Practice Direction 2:JPD 2 of 2020 – Special measures in response to Covid-19).

The Attorney General Department has also classified legal services as “essential” and thus family lawyers and courts are available to assist people in need for the duration of the crisis.

General guidance for parents during Covid-19

Every family is different, every situation involving children is different so no written statement can ever substitute for advice from a Brisbane Family Lawyer or Gold Coast Family Lawyer.

His Honour however has penned 14 points which I will paraphrase here, that are very helpful in guiding people to make the best choices at this difficult time. 

  1. Act in the best interests of your children, particularly with regard to safety and wellbeing. Courts make orders in the best interests of children but day to day decisions are the responsibility of parents.
  2. Consistent with best interests is continuing to comply with Orders for time and communication.
  3. Situations may arise that make compliance impossible i.e. if a Contact Centre is closed. Other situations may raise an immediate safety risk – such as where a parent or person close to them has Covid 19. These situations may amount to a “reasonable excuse” not to comply. However, a in such a situation a Judge would need to agree with you on a contravention application. 
  4. As a first step, parents should communicate with each other (if it is safe to do so). This ought to be conducted “reasonably and sensibly” and aimed at achieving a practical solution to the issue. 
  5. If there is going to be a change to arrangements, even for a short time, they should be reduced to writing so everyone understands the agreement. 
  6. If people need guidance with an agreement, there are services such as the Family Relationship Advice line (1800 050 321) that can provide assistance and family dispute resolution services. 
  7. Lawyers such as Hooper Family Lawyers can also assist with mediation service and helping negotiate an agreement. 
  8. If necessary, Consent Orders can be filed electronically.
  9. If parents can’t agree or it is unsafe to negotiate, and there are real concerns, the parents may approach the court electronically for a variation to orders.
  10. Where there is no agreement, parents should keep the children safe until the dispute can be resolved. Further, if time is stopped there should be some contact between the other parent and children.
  11. Act reasonably. Section 70NAE Family Law Act 1975 makes “reasonable excuse” a defence to a contravention and therefore a matter relevant to the court.
  12. If the strict letter of the orders cannot be adhered to, parents should ensure the purpose or spirit of the orders is respected.
  13. If there is some immediate danger to a child contact the police.
  14. Perpetration or threats of family violence is never in a child’s best interests.

His Honour went on to clarify that the community can be assured the court will continue to perform their duties during the Covid-19 crisis.

Family Dispute Resolution (such as mediation) during Covid-19

It remains the case that Section 60I Family Law Act 1975 must be complied with requiring that before commencing court proceedings (unless one of the matters in Section 60I(9) applies) parents must attend mediation before filing proceedings in a court for a parenting order.

Family law advice

If you have any queries in relation to separation, divorce, de facto relationships, property settlement or child support payments, my firm Hooper Family Lawyers can assist you with practical advice. 

We are family lawyers servicing all areas in Brisbane and on the Gold Coast.

We are certainly approaching unprecedented and concerning times. While most people would agree that the health of the community and limiting the spread of the virus is paramount, it is also critically important that regular life carries on despite this pandemic.

There is no doubt that over the next few months we will need to adapt in different ways, and within the legal profession this has started to occur with respect to the way lawyers and the Courts will carry on delivering our services.

Parenting Orders during the Covid 19 Pandemic 

There is no doubt heightened anxiety, and fear for children transitioning out of a parent’s home in the current climate. However, the crisis doesn’t mean that Parenting Orders don’t need to be followed. 

There are penalties for noncompliance with Orders without a “reasonable excuse” and increased cost and conflict inevitably results from a Contravention of Parenting Orders. 

I don’t intend to examine the law surrounding Contravention Applications here, but I would recommend that if you think you have a reasonable excuse to contravene a Parenting Order, that you obtain advice from an Accredited Specialist Family Lawyer before you take any such action. Similarly, if you believe there has been a contravention without reasonable excuse, obtaining timely advice is important.

What is invariably best for your children (and your wallet) however is some common sense, flexibility and good communication. You can always negotiate outside of the Orders and come to an agreement in unusual situations. 

The Family Law Section of the Law Council of Australia has put out a 10-point Guide to help separated parents during Covid 19. These are:

  1. Keep yourself and your children healthy – Follow advice and guidelines such as social distancing, hygiene i.e. hand washing, coughing into your elbow etc. Inform your children how and why these things are important. Communicate what you’re doing to the other parent and try to establish a routine between the two households.
  2. Consider that your children don’t process these events in the same way as adults and they may be very anxious. You can be certain they are hearing a lot of what is going on in news reports and they will have received information via schools. Some kids may have had important events they were looking forward to being cancelled, and they may be missing their school friends.
  3. Meet your Parenting Order obligations. If challenges arise (travel restrictions or quarantine) there may be a reasonable excuse but communicate and look for other options.
  4. Try other methods such as FaceTime etc to keep children in contact with their friends, other family members etc. Adapt your routines and activities.
  5. As difficult as it might be, do your best to be on the same page as the other parent especially around the things you will do to limit the potential for exposure to the virus. Be open about your concerns and raise them in a non-accusatory, open, businesslike manner.
  6. Be flexible and mutual. If you are asking the other parent for a concession in the best interests of the children, make a concession as well. What I mean by this is allow “make up time” for example.
  7. Show compassion. Not everyone will react to the crisis the same way. Try to remain calm even when your ex-partner is not.
  8. When disagreements arise look for solutions and compromise. Emotions are high and Courts will have increasingly limited availability (discussed below), as will other dispute resolution services.
  9. Try to work together. Some parents may be out of work, while other parents may work in essential service during time when schools are closed. Can you help each other out? As much as possible your children will benefit greatly by not just having you work together; but by seeing you work together.
  10. Staying positive especially when your children are watching. They take their cues from you. This will end and we will get back to normal.

What if I need Family Law advice during the Pandemic?

Hooper Family Lawyers will be fully operational during the Covid 19 crisis. 

Our practice management (and client file management) has been electronic for 10 years and our system is cloud based. We can view your complete file from a mobile phone or other computer or device. 

During this time we can take our instructions, including initial instructions, over the phone. 

We regularly represent people in mediations electronically and appear in Court electronically. 

Many businesses will need to adapt to the crisis, but we are fortunate in that our practice has embraced remote technology for many years. This means minimal disruption to us delivering our services to you.  

Will the Courts be shut down? Should I bother with this now?

The Courts (Commonwealth and State) have issued a number of Practice Directions with respect to the way the crisis will be managed. I only intend to focus on Courts relevant to my clients here.

Southport Magistrates Court – Guideline 1 of 2020 (Made under Practice Direction 2 of 2020):

In Domestic Violence Matters appearances by legally represented parties are excused and all parties may appear by phone.

For the filing of Protection Order Applications, this can be done by post of it is not urgent. In urgent matters the Police can be contacted to obtain an urgent Temporary Order. Similar process for appearance in the Southport Magistrates Court sitting as the Children’s Court.

Family Court and Federal Circuit Court Listing Arrangements:

Each registry may adopt their own operational requirements however the following are generally being implemented:

For first Court dates, mentions, interim hearings and directions, telephone procedure will be:

  1. The Court will contact the parties to indicate matters will be heard by phone.
  2. After being notified a party may approach the Court to seeking that the matter does not proceed by phone if, a. it is not practicable to do so; or, b. the matter is urgent and requires “face to face” hearing.
  3. If “face to face” is required, the parties should contact the chambers of the presiding judge by email and provide a brief outline as to why the matter is urgent and/or requires “face to face”. 
  4. If telephone is not practicable, and the matter is not urgent, it may be adjourned to a future date to be advised.
  5. Otherwise the Court should have the contact details (i.e. telephone) at least 2 days prior to the hearing.
  6. If the parties can agree on Interim Orders or Directions in advance and not require a hearing, they can simply be emailed to the Associate for Orders to be made by consent. 

In some ways the above may be a blessing in disguise. I have long believed that telephone duty lists before Registrars for Directions and Consent Orders would be a good idea. Primarily because this would save litigants a lot of money in legal costs. 

When your lawyer can sit in the office, do other work, and then take a call to appear and represent you, you are saving money because your lawyer is not out of office for half a day travelling and waiting to appear.

For Hearings (i.e. Final Hearing or Trial) the process will be:

  1. Callovers for each matter will be conducted by each Judge by telephone over April 2020 and May 2020. 
  2. The Judge will want to know the urgency and status of each matter to prioritise Hearings and whether Hearing by telephone could occur.
  3. Cases that are of lower priority may be referred to FDR (Family Dispute Resolution). Cases of high priority will be listed and be heard in accordance with the “face to face” protocol (discussed below).

Face to Face in Court Protocol 

There are several protocols for Court Hearings designed to limit the risk of infection to the public, Court Staff and Judges. These are:

  1. As stated above. Urgent matters will receive listings. Listings will be staggered so that people can maintain social distancing and not have to congregate in Court foyers. To reduce the length of hearings written submissions etc will be permitted. 
  2. No more than 8 people will be allowed in the Court room (excluding the Judge and Associate). Solicitors, Counsel and parties will have designated areas to maintain distance. Parties are required to exit the Court room and building immediately after the Hearing. 
  3. Additional Court room cleaning. Hearings will occur for not more than 1.5 hours at a time and will be closed for cleaning afterwards. 
  4. Security screening will be staggered for social distance to be maintained. The Court is looking into obtaining contactless thermometers to allow for non-invasive temperature measurement.  If anyone at Court displays symptoms, they need to immediately notify and leave the Court (hopefully this won’t occur during intense cross examination…).

Practice Direction PD2 of 2020 – Electronic filing annexures to Affidavits and viewing of subpoenas

All documents are now permitted to be filed electronically. If the documents can’t be filed on the Commcourts Portal, they can be emailed to the Registry to be filed. Hard copies should not be posted or delivered to the Registry except in limited circumstances (such as where a party is self-represented and has no email).

Unless total annexures are more than 2 centimetres, they should be attached to the Affidavit when it is filed electronically. If the documents is more than 2 centimetres an Application should be made to the Registry Case Coordinator who may liaise with the Duty Registrar and Docket Judge.

If the Application is successful, the documents can be emailed to the Court for filing.

Practice Direction PD3 of 2020 – Electronic filing and viewing of subpoenas:

Subpoena viewing appointments should only be made if there is a Hearing within the next 4 weeks or the matter is urgent.

Do I need a lawyer now or should I wait for the Covid 19 crisis to end?

If you are in a Family Law dispute it is always a good idea to get advice. In most situations a good Family Lawyer can assist you to find a fast and amicable solution.

If the fast and amicable solution cannot be found, there are options for FDR such as mediation or arbitration that can be utilised at this time when Court availability is restricted.

If you need a Court option, there will be delays. But bear in mind the Court system was experiencing delays (largely due to lack of funding) before Covid 19 reared its ugly head. This means when Covid 19 goes away it will be busy, and it is a fair assumption that non urgent matters will be prioritised “first in time”. 

Financial uncertainty is another factor in preventing people seeking help. At Hooper Family Lawyers we can explore options such as deferred fees, Legal Aid and fixed fees to assist with the financial burden. 

Family law advice

If you have any queries in relation to separation, divorce, de facto relationships, property settlement or child support payments, my firm Hooper Family Lawyers can assist you with practical advice. 

We are family lawyers servicing all areas in Brisbane and on the Gold Coast.

The Federal Circuit Court has issued Practice Direction No2 of 2020 which sets out more streamlined procedures for dealing with matrimonial property settlement matters. 

The new procedures apply to cases with a total net value of property less than $500,000 (called PPP500 cases i.e. Priority Property Pool cases) and apply to family law property settlements in Brisbane filed after 1 March 2020.

The purpose of the Practice Direction is expressed to achieve “just, efficient and timely resolution” of cases with less than $500,000 net property for distribution. In order to achieve this the [practice direction requires:

  • The parties attend mediation or some other alternative dispute resolution at the earliest possible opportunity; and 
  • If alternate dispute resolution isn’t successful, to provide for a less adversarial hearing or a hearing “in chambers” without the need for witnesses and cross examination.

The process is being trialled in the Brisbane Family Court Registry (and in Paramatta, Adelaide and Melbourne), and is available if an initiating application has been filed for a matrimonial property or de facto property settlement after 1 March 2020.

To be eligible a matter, as stated above, must have total assets and super less than $500,000 and there must be no entities such as companies, SMSF or trusts requiring valuation or other expert evidence to determine issues such as control. If the criteria are met the Court may declare the matter is a PPP500 case. 

There are specific exclusions to the pilot program for any matters involving parenting applications (including where parenting and property issues are relevant), contravention applications, child support or child maintenance issues or spousal maintenance issues. 

Bringing a PPP 500 Application

Pursuant to Rule 2.04 Federal Circuit Court Rules 2001 (“the Rules”) a new for called the Financial Summary form has been approved.

Where litigants consider that the PPP500 ought to apply, they may commence proceedings by filing the Initiating Application along with the Financial Summary form. 

In situations where proceedings have been commenced in the regular manner (with an Initiating Application, Affidavit in support and Financial Statement), the court may subsequently designate the matter as being a PPP500 matter and direct the filing of a Financial Summary form.

When the matter is commenced by way of the streamlined process, aspects of the Rules such as the filing of Affidavits or Financial Statement are suspended until directions provide otherwise. For example, if mediation is unsuccessful and the matter requires a decision by a Judge, direction for Affidavit and Financial Statement will likely be made. 

The Financial Summary form

The Financial Summary form requires information similar to that which would be included in an Affidavit in a property settlement matter. However, with the information being provided in question and answer style, it is likely to make the form easier for self-represented litigant to complete and directs attention to what is relevant.

The form has 11 parts covering information about the parties, any alternative dispute resolution they have attended, information about any existing agreements (parenting or property), a series of questions towards financial factual matters, personal circumstances, income, debts and expenses, children and parenting arrangements, changes to property and a balance sheet of the relationship (i.e. a list of assets, liabilities and superannuation).

The Process in a nutshell

The process can be summarised as comprising 6 steps in the PPP500 procedure. These are:

  1. Once the Application and Financial Summary is filed, or the case has been designated as PPP500, a Registrar of the Court can make directions in chambers for certain things to be done before the first Court date. These could include valuations conducted, disclosure of bank statements, tax records, payslips etc.
  2. At the second stage the parties and their legal representatives appear before a Registrar in Court to make sure that the matter is ready for alternative dispute resolution to occur. This would require making sure there is an agreed balance sheet, disclosure has been completed and prior directions complied with. Cost penalties could apply to any party who has failed to comply with directions. If an interim decision is required on an issue, the matter could also be referred to a Judge to determine the interim issue.
  3. The third stage is attendance at alternative dispute resolution. This would likely be a Registrar run Conciliation Conference in the majority of cases, but it could be an external mediation, Legal Aid Conference or even arbitration.
  4. If the matter is not resolved at alternative dispute resolution it will return before the Registrar for the second Court date. At this stage it is anticipated valuations and disclosure will be complete, offers exchanged and balance sheet ready to be finalised. Further negotiation may take place and the mater may be stood down for this to occur and if the matter is close to resolution it may be obtain a further Court date before referral to the Judge. A Registrar may discuss the merits of each party’s case and provide information about less adversarial process and for the matter to be heard “on the papers” i.e. by a Judge in chambers – not open Court. In a typical case this would be the last of the Registrar’s involvement before the matter is referred to a Judge for case management.
  5. Once the matter is before the Judge the Judge will finalise the balance sheet, identify evidentiary issues and make directions for the final hearing – such as for Affidavits and Financial Statement to be filed.
  6. The last step being the hearing whether it occur in chambers, as a less adversarial trial (i.e. one where Division 12A Family Law Act 1975 applies and the rules of evidence do not apply – unless the Court decides otherwise) or as a traditional trial. 

It is envisaged that at any time during the process if the parties are able to reach a final agreement, Orders could be made in chambers by a Registrar. 

This would occur with a signed and dated agreement being emailed to the Registrar, a clean Word copy of the Minute of Order, evidence of procedural fairness for a superannuation split and a letter addressing matters of “justice and equity”.

It is hoped that these measures will lead to timelier and less expensive resolution of smaller property matters, with the Registrar led part of the process being envisaged as being completed inside 90 days. 

Peter Hooper – Hooper Family Lawyers Gold Coast and Brisbane – We are Family Law Specialists, providing Expert Family Law advice and representation. 

While Christmas is a time for bringing families together, unfortunately it is also a time when family disputes can occur. 

As a family lawyer of some 18 years experience I have long noted the seasonal nature of family law work, and in particular that there is an increase in family law enquiries over, or just after, the Christmas season. I imagine it has something to do with people having increased time together, the high expectation to make the holiday “special”, financial concerns and an abundance of alcohol, creating issues for some families. 

Given it is also the end of the new year perhaps it is a time for “new beginnings” and moving on with a new chapter of people’s lives and deciding to make a change.

For people who are already in dispute, Christmas can be a source of loneliness, anxiety and conflict over children’s arrangements.  Christmas holiday time and uncertainty in terms of the future can make this time of year very difficult for some people when it seems as though the rest of the world is celebrating.

What can you do to make the best out of separated parenting at Christmas?

The best answer is come to an agreement, and if you’re already in a dispute in the lead up to Christmas make sure you leave plenty of time to negotiate. Court dates can be hard to obtain in the lead up to Christmas. 

In negotiating arrangements, it is important to think in a way that promotes what is best for the children. To use a lawyer phrase, maintain “child focus”. 

This means that both parents should consider what the holiday means from the children’s perspective, when they might like to see the other parent, what are their practical needs around the holiday, and are there any safety considerations. 

Christmas is about creating memories for children, so in my view it is important in making these arrangements to think about how the children may remember the particular Christmas. 

It is also likely that the separation is something the children are coming to terms with, and thus an amicable agreement at Christmas time is going to allow them to be a bit more relaxed, reassured and enjoy their Christmas holiday time.

If you are in a situation where your ex-partner is difficult or unreasonable, early planning, good legal advice, child focus and staying calm will assist you to negotiate your way through the difficult time. 

Planning and good legal advice assists you to stay calm, knowing that there is “light at the end of the tunnel” in terms of an outcome being worked towards. 

Conversely, staying calm and child focused facilitates outcomes being achieved that are favourable for you and your children.

What about separating during the Christmas break?

Even more stressful is relationship breakdown during the holiday period. Most lawyers take time off over this period and Court dates can be difficult to obtain in all but the most urgent of matters.

Again, the recommendation is to stay as calm as possible, stay child focused and get some advice as soon as you can. As said above, advice provides you with direction and reassurance which can help you stay calm. Also, be careful what you say, text or email if there is alcohol around.

During the Christmas and New Year period in 2019 we are closed from 24 December 2019 until Monday, 6 January 2020. But …while we are closed we are never too far away and if you desperately need some assistance for family law on the Gold Coast or in Brisbane we can be contacted via email to assist at peter.hooper@hooperfamilylawyers.com.au

Stay safe and have a happy Christmas.

If your matter is going to court and you need assistance, contact Hooper Family Lawyers at Victoria Point on (07) 3207 7663; or Hooper Family Lawyers Coolangatta on (07) 5599 3026.